Speakers

Presentations by guest speakers will focus on their experiences before the Inter-American Court; the impact of the decisions of this regional judicial body in their respective national jurisdictions; the problems that persist; the rationale, effectiveness and challenges (financial, political and administrative) encountered by the principal organs of the Organization of American States responsible for the implementation of human rights (the Commission and the Court Inter-American); as well as better models of action taken for the protection and advancement of human rights.

 

Friday


Opening Remarks

  • François Larocque, Dean, Common Law Section, University of Ottawa
  • Jacques Frémont, President of the University of Ottawa and formerly, President of the Quebec Human Rights
    & Youth Rights Commission
  • Margarette May Macaulay, First Vice-President, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR)
Margarette May Macaulay

Margarette May Macaulay

First Vice-President, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights
Biography

Commissioner Margarette May Macaulay is citizen of Jamaica. She was elected on June 16, 2015, by the OAS General Assembly, for a 4-year mandate that starts on January 1, 2016 and ends December 31, 2019. She holds a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of London and is currently an attorney in private practice. She serves as Mediator in the Supreme Court of Jamaica and an Associate Arbitrator, as well as serving as a Notary Public. She served as a Judge of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights from 2007 to 2012, contributing to the formulation of the Court’s Rules of Procedure.

François Larocque

François Larocque

Interim Dean for the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section, University of Ottawa
Biography

François Larocque studied philosophy before graduating from the common law French program in 2000. He clerked both at the Court of Appeal for Ontario (2000-2001) and at the Supreme Court of Canada (2001-2002), working successively for the Honourable Justices Charron, Borins, Goudge, Labrosse and Arbour.

A Commonwealth Scholar, SSHRC Doctoral Fellow, Ricard Fellow and Honorary Prince of Wales Scholar, Larocque began his doctoral research in 2002 at the University of Cambridge (Trinity College) under the joint supervision of Professors James Crawford and Philip Allott. His thesis examined the jurisdiction of national courts in civil proceedings for serious violations of international law.

Dr. Larocque has published in the areas of philosophy of law, Canadian legal history, civil liability, human rights and international law. He is currently most active in two areas of research:

1. Civil Liability for grave breaches of international human rights

Building on his doctoral research, Dr. Larocque remains most interested in the field of transnational human rights litigation, that is, civil actions in the domestic courts of one country in relation to grave human rights violations that occurred in another country.  This broad area of concern blurs the conceptual boundaries that once separated international and domestic law on one hand, and public and private law on the other. Specific areas of interest include the development of international torts, universal jurisdiction, the law of State immunity, forum non conveniens, and other prudential considerations. He is the author of “Civil Actions for Uncivilsed Acts” (Irwin Law, 2010) the first Canadian treatise on transnational human rights litigation. In addition to his academic research on the subject, Larocque has intervened as counsel inBouzari v Islamic Republic of Iran (CA Ont), Kazemi v Islamic Republic of Iran (QSC, QCA, SCC), Club Resorts v Van Breda (SCC). Larocque has also testified as an expert witness before the House of Commons Sub-Committee on International Human Rights on issues relating to transnational human rights litigation.

2.    Language Rights of Canadian French-language minorities 

Dr. Larocque has pioneered research on the constitutional protection of the language rights of French-speaking minority communities in Canada. For example, his research has shed new light on the constitutional compact between the Imperial government, Canada and the inhabitants of Rupert’s Land, that led to the creation of the Western provinces.  He has theorized novel applications of the Federal fiduciary duty owed to minority official language communities. He is also interested by Ontario’s language management schemes.

 

Jacques Frémont

Jacques Frémont

President for the University of Ottawa  and formerly, President of the Quebec Human Rights & Youth Rights Commission

 

Biography

Jacques Frémont is President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Ottawa. In 2013, Quebec’s legislative assembly appointed him to chair the Quebec Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission. Prior to this appointment, he worked at the Open Society Foundations, in New York, as Director of the International Higher Education Support Program.

Mr. Frémont was formerly at the University of Montreal, where he was Dean of the School of Law, as well as Provost and Vice-Rector (Academic Affairs) until 2010. He has also been a visiting professor at many Quebec, Canadian, European and Asian universities, and is the author of several books, articles and book chapters on constitutional law and public law. In 2012, he was named professor emeritus of the University of Montreal.

Throughout his career, Mr. Frémont has advised various international organizations on issues involving human rights, good governance and democracy, and has directed major international cooperation projects in the fields of human rights and judicial training. He has also been very active in higher education in Canada and abroad.

Mr. Frémont is a graduate of Laval University, in Quebec City, and pursued graduate studies at York University in Toronto. He has been awarded prizes and honours, including being named to the Order of the French Academic Palms in 2009 and receiving an honorary doctorate from Paul Cézanne University in Aix-en-Provence in 2010.


Context of Canada and the Inter-American System of Human Rights

Chair

Yves le Bouthillier

Yves le Bouthillier

Vice Dean and Professor, Common Law Section, uOttawa
Biography

Professor Yves Le Bouthillier teaches international law, including international human rights law & international environmental law and related fields such as immigration and refugee law. His most recent publication, which he wrote as co-authored with Professor Delphine Nakache, is entitled “The Right of Citizenship in Canada” (published by Yvon Blais, December 2016).

He is also interested in the protection of linguistic minorities and co-authored a book on the matter. He is currently Vice-Dean of the Common Law Program in French. From 2008 to 2016, he was Co-Director of the Secretariat of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. In 2007-2008, he was Director of Graduate Studies in Law. From June 2005 to December 2006, he was President of the Canadian Law Commission. He also sat on the Board of Governors of the Law Commission of Ontario.

He also served as the Associate Dean of the Common Law Program in French from July 2002 to June 2005. From August 2000 to June 2002, he was a residency academic in the Economic Law, Oceans, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. In 2001 the bargaining team of which he was a member won the Head of the Civil Service Award for its contribution to the development and adoption of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. Previously, from 1999 to 2000, he was responsible for projects in human rights at the Agence de la Francophonie in Paris. He also appeared before various parliamentary committees and acted as an expert in the Secession Reference. For several years he served as Vice-President of the Canadian Council of International Law and co-directed the production of two books for the Council. In 2008, the Association of French Speaking Lawyers of Ontario awarded him with the Order of Merit for his contribution to the promotion and improvement of legal services in French in Ontario.

Elise Hansbury

Elise Hansbury

Member of Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development and Society; UQAM
Biography

After completing her master’s degree in international law and then pursuing doctoral studies at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Elise Hansbury is currently pursuing her studies under the supervision of Professor Bernard Duhaime at UQAM. Her research focuses on international human rights law, and more specifically on the inter-American system for the protection of human rights. A student member of Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development and Society. She is also a lecturer at the UQAM’s International Human Rights Clinic where she works primarily on human rights issues in the Americas. A member of the Québec Bar, Elise Hansbury practiced law in Montreal and then as a junior lawyer with the International Labor Standards Department at the International Labor Organization in Geneva. She has also acted as teaching assistant in the Department of International Law of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies.

Theme 1: The Purpose of the Inter-American System of Human Rights: The   Canadian Case

John Packer

John Packer

Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre and Associate Professor for the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section, University of Ottawa
Biography

Professor John Packer has recently taken up responsibilities as an Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre (HRREC) at the University of Ottawa.

Prof. Packer previously held academic positions at the University of Essex where he was the Director of the world-renowned Human Rights Centre and at The Fletcher School, Tufts University. He has held Fellowships at Cambridge and Harvard Universities and lectured at universities and professional institutions around the world. He has been widely published and contributes to the editing of a number of scholarly journals. He also serves on the boards of a number of NGOs and is a Member of the Expert Advisory Panel for the Shared Societies Project of the Club de Madrid comprising almost 100 former Heads of State or Government of democracies.

Prof. Packer is also an experienced practitioner bringing to the University of Ottawa some 20 years working for inter-governmental organizations, including in Geneva for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, the International Labour Organisation, and for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights investigating serious human rights violations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Burma/Myanmar, extrajudicial executions, arbitrary detention, forced disappearances, the use of forensic sciences, the use of civil defense forces, and the independence of judges and lawyers throughout the world. From 1995 to 2004, he was Senior Legal Adviser and then the first Director of the Office of the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities in The Hague working across Central and Eastern Europe and throughout the former Soviet Union. For the last two years, Prof. Packer was a Constitutions and Process Design Expert on the United Nation’s Standby Team of Mediation Experts attached to the Department of Political Affairs, advising in numerous peace processes and political transitions around the world focusing on conflict prevention and resolution, diversity management, constitutional and legal reform, and the protection of human rights including minorities.

Prof. Packer’s strength in the practice of international law and relations underpins his vision for applied research in public policy and a practice-orientation in the activities of the HRREC. He intends to build on the HRREC’s record of achievement, emphasizing know-how and skills for students and professionals interested in the effective realization of human rights throughout Canada and the world.

Theme 2: The Purpose of the Existence of a System of Protection of Human Rights

James L. Cavallaro

James L. Cavallaro

Former President of the Inter-American Commission and Director for the Stanford Human Rights Center
Biography

Commissioner James L. Cavallaro is a citizen of the United States. He was elected during the 43rd regular session of the OAS General Assembly in June 2013 for the prescribed four-year term, which began on January 1, 2014. In the 154th Period of Sessions in March 2015, he was elected First Vice-Chair. He became President on January 1, 2016, after former Commissioner Rose Marie Belle Antoine –who was the President- finished on December 31, 2015, the period for which she had been elected. James L. Cavallaro is a lawyer with an undergraduate degree from Harvard College, as well as a law degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a PhD in Human Rights and Development of the Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain. Currently, James L. Cavallaro is a Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Founding Director of both the International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic at Stanford and the Stanford Human Rights Center. Previously, he was a Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Executive Director of the Human Rights Program at Harvard. He founded the Brazil-based Global Justice Center and served as Director of the Brazil offices of Human Rights Watch and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL). He is the author of dozens of articles, books, and other publications on human rights and the inter-American human rights system.

Theme 3: Canadian Ratification of the American Convention on Human Rights


The Possible Place of Canada in the Inter-American System of Human Rights

Yves le Bouthillier

Yves le Bouthillier

Vice Dean and Professor, Common Law Section, uOttawa
Biography

Professor Yves Le Bouthillier teaches international law, including international human rights law & international environmental law and related fields such as immigration and refugee law. His most recent publication, which he wrote as co-authored with Professor Delphine Nakache, is entitled “The Right of Citizenship in Canada” (published by Yvon Blais, December 2016).

He is also interested in the protection of linguistic minorities and co-authored a book on the matter. He is currently Vice-Dean of the Common Law Program in French. From 2008 to 2016, he was Co-Director of the Secretariat of the IUCN Academy of Environmental Law. In 2007-2008, he was Director of Graduate Studies in Law. From June 2005 to December 2006, he was President of the Canadian Law Commission. He also sat on the Board of Governors of the Law Commission of Ontario.

He also served as the Associate Dean of the Common Law Program in French from July 2002 to June 2005. From August 2000 to June 2002, he was a residency academic in the Economic Law, Oceans, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. In 2001 the bargaining team of which he was a member won the Head of the Civil Service Award for its contribution to the development and adoption of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. Previously, from 1999 to 2000, he was responsible for projects in human rights at the Agence de la Francophonie in Paris. He also appeared before various parliamentary committees and acted as an expert in the Secession Reference. For several years he served as Vice-President of the Canadian Council of International Law and co-directed the production of two books for the Council. In 2008, the Association of French Speaking Lawyers of Ontario awarded him with the Order of Merit for his contribution to the promotion and improvement of legal services in French in Ontario.

The Honourable Marie Deschamps

The Honourable Marie Deschamps

Former Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada

 

Biography

The Honorable Marie Deschamps earned a Bachelor of Law from the Université de Montréal in 1974 and a Master’s Degree in Law from McGill University in 1983. The Université de Montréal and Sherbrooke each awarded her with an honorary doctorate in 2008 and in 2014. She was named a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers in 2005. The McGill Faculty of Law also awarded her the F.R. Scott Award for exemplary service in 2013. She was also named Companion of Order of Canada the same year. The Barreau du Québec awarded her with the distinction of Lawyer Emeritus in 2014.

Admitted to the Québec Bar in 1975, she practiced as a lawyer in the firms Martineau Walker and Sylvestre and Matte in the areas of civil, family and commercial law. She then practiced criminal law at Rouleau, Rumanek and Sirois, and then at Byers Casgrain in civil and commercial law.

She was appointed a judge of the Quebec Superior Court in 1990, the Quebec Court of Appeal in 1992 and the Supreme Court of Canada in 2002. She retired from the judiciary in August 2012 and became a lawyer again in 2013. In 2014, she was entrusted by the Government of Canada to lead an independent investigation into sexual misconduct in the Canadian Armed Forces. Then, in 2015, she was assigned by the United Nations as a member of the consultative committee examining the allegations of sexual assault of children by French soldiers in the Central African Republic.

She has been an Associate Professor at the Faculties of Law at the Université de Sherbrooke since 2006 and at McGill University since 2012. She is regularly invited to give lectures to various audiences, mainly in constitutional and commercial law, and Governance and ethics.

Saturday 

Round Tables


Round Table 1: The Protection of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transexual, and Intersexual (LGBTI) People in the Inter-American System of Human Rights

  • Trilingual moderator: Jolane T. Lauzon, Lawyer Bar of Quebec
  • Rapporteur: Jânia Maria Lopes Saldanha
  • Robert Wintemute, Professor, the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College
  • Douglas Victor Janoff, Senior Policy Advisor, Global Affairs Canada
  • Salvador Herencia Carrasco, Director of the Human Rights Clinic, HRREC. Round 
 
Jolane T. Lauzon

Jolane T. Lauzon

Counsel for Department of Justice Canada
Biography

Jolane T. Lauzon is a member of the Barreau du Québec. She holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations and international law and a bachelor’s degree in civil law from UQAM. Counsel Lauzon became involved with the UQAM’s International Human Rights Clinic, which gave her the opportunity to work on the Nadège Dorzema v. the Dominican Republic, presented before the American Human Rights Council. Ms. Lauzon also participated in the Inter-American Law Advocacy Competition in 2013, where she furthered her knowledge of LGBT rights. She has completed an internship at the Institute for Gulf Affairs in Washington, DC, working to promote human rights in the Gulf region, particularly women’s rights in Saudi Arabia. Since 2015, she has been with the Department of Justice Canada.

Jânia Maria L. Saldanha

Jânia Maria L. Saldanha

Directrice adj. du Programme d'études supérieures, Faculté de droit, Univ. fédérale de Santa Maria, Brésil
Biographie

Le professeur Saldanha est responsable de la chaire « Internationalisation du Droit, Droit cosmopolitique et Systèmes de justice » et coordinatrice du CULTIS (Centre de Cultures Juridiques Comparées) à l’Université de Santa Maria. Membre de l’Ordre des Avocats au Brésil et avocate pro bono, elle a produit de nombreuses études relatives à la réforme du pouvoir judiciaire brésilien.
Elle exerce également des fonctions d’édition pour la revue REDESG, Revue des « Droits émergents de la société globale ».

Robert Wintemute

Robert Wintemute

Professor of Human Rights Law, King's College London
Biography

Robert Wintemute is a Professor of Human Rights Law at King’s College London, UK.  Originally from Calgary, he did his B.A. at the University of Alberta and Université Laval, his LL.B. and his B.C.L. at McGill University and, after practicing bankruptcy law for five years with Milbank in New York, his D.Phil. at the University of Oxford. He has worked on lesbian and gay human rights cases in the European Court of Human Rights, the Court of Justice of the European Union, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the Constitutional Court of Colombia, and the Supreme Courts of Argentina, Massachusetts and the United States.  He was an expert witness in the three lesbian and gay human rights cases decided by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights to date:  Atala Riffo v. Chile (2012), Duque v. Colombia(2016), and Flor Freire v. Ecuador (2016).

Douglas Janoff

Douglas Janoff

Ph. D. Candidate, School of Canadian Studies, Carleton University
Global Affairs Canada
Penalist Expert

PANELIST EXPERT

Douglas Janoff is a researcher on LGBT human rights issues and a foreign service officer at Global Affairs Canada. From 2010 to 2014, he was an Alternate Representative to the Permanent Mission of Canada to the OAS in Washington, D.C., with a focus on human rights issues. In Ottawa, he was a senior advisor in the Human Rights and Indigenous Policy division, supporting Canada’s missions to the UN, the OAS and the OSCE, with a focus on Canada’s LGBT human rights policy. In 2005, the University of Toronto Press published his first book, Pink Blood: Homophobic Violence in Canada. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the School of Canadian Studies at Carleton University. He is currently writing his dissertation, entitled “Homophobia, Human Rights and Diplomacy.” It focuses on the role of multilateral human rights diplomacy in the area of LGBT rights and examines the relationship between diplomats and representatives from civil society.

 
Salvador H. Carrasco

Salvador H. Carrasco

Ph.d. candidate, member of the HRREC
Biography

Lawyer (J.D.) with experience on International Law, International Criminal Law and Human Rights. Former legal advisor of the Andean Commission of Jurists (2003-2008) in projects regarding the implementation of the Rome Statute in Latin America and the strengthening of the Andean Community. Former advisor to the Committee for the reform of the Peruvian Criminal Code and the Peruvian Human Rights’ Council. Representative of the Andean Commission of Jurists before the Coalition for the International Criminal Court’s Steering Committee. Director of the Project, “Peru’s International Human Rights Obligations” for the drafting of Peru’s National Human Rights Plan for the Ministry of Justice. Lecturer and visiting professor at national and international seminars on International Criminal Law and Human Rights. Author of publications on the International Criminal Court, the Andean integration process and Human Rights. Member of the Latin-American Study Group on International Criminal Law chaired by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation and Göttingen University. Co-founder and pro-bono consultant of SALGALU Comunicación & Responsabilidad Social, consultancy agency on Corporate Social Responsibility and investment in children. Current Senior Jurisdictional advisor to the Constitutional Court of Peru on matters regarding International Law, International Criminal Law and constitutionality of laws (September 2008-present)

 


Round Table 2: Legal Models of Recognition of Aboriginal Rights

  • Trilingual moderator: John Giokas
  • Rapporteur: Nelson Arturo Ovalle Diaz
  • Ghislain Otis, Canada Research Chair in Legal Diversity and Aboriginal Rights, Professor, Civil Law Section, University of Ottawa Sébastien Grammond, Professor, Civil Law Section, University of Ottawa
  • Sergio Fuenzalida B., Human Rights Coordinator, Universidad Central, Chile
John Giokas

John Giokas

Biography
John Giokas is a retired lawyer who worked in criminal and Aboriginal law for thirty years in the private practice of law, as the Government Relations Officer at the Canadian Bar Association, as a special assistant in the offices of two ministers of Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development and as legal counsel at the federal Department of Justice.  He has also worked with three Aboriginal organizations (Assembly of First Nations, Congress of Aboriginal Peoples and the Manitoba Metis Association), two commissions of inquiry (Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples and the Indian Specific Claims Commission) and a federal task force on Aboriginal languages sponsored by the Department of Canadian Heritage.  He has published extensively in print and in electronic form in the fields of Aboriginal law and policy, has testified before parliamentary committees many times and is currently a registered lobbyist at Quinn Public Affairs in Ottawa.
 
Ghislain Otis

Ghislain Otis

Canada Research Chair in Legal Diversity and Aboriginal Rights and Professor, Civil Law Section, University of Ottawa

 

Biography

Professor Ghislain Otis is a specialist of aboriginal law, legal pluralism, constitutional law and human rights. In 2008, he joined the Faculty of Law of the University of Ottawa as the Canada Research Chair on Legal Diversity and Indigenous Peoples and has since then worked on issues related to indigenous governance and legal pluralism in Canada, the United States, Mayotte and the Pacific insular states among others. He is currently the director of an international team for the project “The State and Indigenous Legal Cultures: Law in Search of Legitimacy”

Nelson Arturo Ovalle Diaz

Nelson Arturo Ovalle Diaz

Professor for the Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa
Biography

Nelson Arturo OVALLE DIAZ has been a part-time professor at the University of Ottawa since 2010 and is also an expert advisor to many social enterprises and community organizations.

In 2015, Professor OVALLE DIAZ earned his Ph.D. in Transnational Law from the University of Ottawa with the thesis entitled: “La production pluraliste du droit transnational contemporain”. His dissertation asserts that the theory of legal positivism, which was relatively valid until the end of the Cold War, seems to have been surpassed by the world of the twenty-first century. The competencies based on the Westphalian model of territorial sovereignty are now shared and exercised by a range of non-state actors. The auto-regulatory power of the latter is rooted in technoscientific knowledge specialized in a particular industry that extends above and beyond state borders. This new manifestation of sovereignty can be incorporated into transnational law. Implementation of the complex transnational legal model is based on a consensus that links states, sub-state units, international organizations and other non-state actors. This new theory must develop a legal discourse based on argumentative strength and not on coercive force. Legal pluralism seems to offer this possibility.

Professor Ovalle Diaz teaches a number of courses on the connections between the law and social sciences. His research interests include legal theory, human rights, international law, constitutional law, transitional justice, social justice, public policy with an emphasis on criminal policies, and alternative mechanisms for conflict resolution which incorporate indigenous perspectives. He has presented his academic work at conferences internationally.

Sergio Fuenzalida B.

Sergio Fuenzalida B.

Human Rights Coordinator, Universidad Central, Chile
Biography

Professor of Human Rights and Constitutional Law at the Central University of Chile, he is a specialist in Human Rights. In his professional experience, he mainly works at the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), where he represented numerous victims before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in countries such as Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. He joined Chili’s Council of the National Institute of Human Rights (NHRI) between 2010 and 2013.

  • Lawyer for the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.
  • Master in Constitutional Law and Public Institutions from Diego Portales University.
  • Diploma in Reform to the Criminal Procedure from the Universidad Alberto Hurtado.
  • Doctorate in Constitutional Law at the University of Buenos Aires (UBA).
Sébastien Grammond

Sébastien Grammond

Professor, Civil Law Section, University of Ottawa
Biography

Sébastien Grammond has been a professor at the Civil Law Section of the University of Ottawa since 2004. He has taught Obligations (contract law), Aboriginal Peoples and the Law, Civil Procedure and Business Organizations.  He became full professor in 2011.  He was Vice-Dean, Research from 2005 to 2008, Acting Dean from 2008 to 2009 and Dean from 2009 to 2014.  In the course of these administrative duties, he participated in the implementation of the minor in law and the programme de droit canadien, and he contributed to the development of a research culture at the Civil Law Section.  He also participated in the creation of a summer course on indigenous legal traditions taught in certain Cree communities of northern Quebec.  In 2016, he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

Sébastien Grammond’s main research interests pertain to indigenous peoples and the law and, more generally, to the legal treatment of minority issues.  He authored three books and several published papers on those subjects. Aménager la coexistence : les peuples autochtones et le droit canadien, published in 2003, is a comprehensive textbook on indigenous peoples and the law in Canada and received the Quebec Bar Foundation prize. An English updated version was published in 2013 under the title Terms of Coexistence: Indigenous Peoples and Canadian Law.  Another book, Identity Captured by Law: Membership in Canada’s Indigenous Peoples and Linguistic Minorities (2009) provides an in-depth analysis of how legal definitions of membership in indigenous communities and linguistic groups may be compatible with human rights and the autonomy of the groups concerned.  Sébastien Grammond’s current research projects focus on the recognition of indigenous groups and benefit from funding granted by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.  His other publications in this field deal with issues such as the adaptation of human rights to cultural difference or the reception of indigenous legal systems in Canadian law.

On the private law side, Sébastien Grammond also conducts research on themes related to contractual justice and the determination of the contents of contracts.  He is the author of several articles on contractual interpretation, abusive clauses and implied obligations.  He recently published, in collaboration with two colleagues of the Faculty of Law, Quebec Contract Law, a textbook that provides a synthesis of the law of contractual obligations in Quebec for an English-speaking audience.

After studies in engineering, Sébastien Grammond obtained a bachelor of law (1992) and a masters of law (1994) from the Université de Montréal.  He began his career as a law clerk to Chief Justice Antonio Lamer of the Supreme Court of Canada.  He practised law for several years at the firm Dentons in Montreal, in particular in the fields of native law, constitutional and administrative law, business law and construction law.  Leaving full-time practice aside in 2001, he obtained a Masters in Legal Research (2002) and a Doctorate in Law (2004) from the University of Oxford.  As a member of the Quebec (1994) and Ontario (2007) bars, he has frequently argued cases before the Quebec Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada, especially in the Securities Reference, the Senate Reform Reference and the Supreme Court Act Reference, as well as before commercial arbitration panels hearing complex cases. He argued for bilingualism in Alberta (the Caron and Boutet case) and against the application of limitation periods in civil claims for sexual assault (the Christensen case).

Sébastien Grammond’s achievements have been recognized by several prizes and distinctions.  He presented the results of his research not only before Canadian audiences, but also in France, Belgium, Spain and Chile.  He also offered training to judges and public service lawyers. He frequently appears in the media, commenting upon subjects with a legal dimension.  The Quebec Bar awarded him the title of advocatus emeritus (Ad.E.) in 2012 and its Merit Award in 2014. He received the David W. Mundell medal (2016), awarded by the government of Ontario to recognize excellence in legal writing.  Together with the other members of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society’s legal team, he received the Ontario Bar Association’s 2017 President’s Award, which recognizes his pro bono work which led to a historic decision of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal.


Round Table 3: Women’s Rights and The Inter-American System of Human Rights

  • Trilingual moderator: Elise Hansbury, Alternate Professor, Department of Legal Sciences and Acting Director of the International Human Rights Clinic: http://www.ciddhu.uqam.ca
  • Rapporteur: Élise Groulx
  • Lucie Lamarche, Professor, Faculty of Law, UQAM
  • Veronica Martinez-Solarez, Latin-American Program Director of the IOVA: http://www.iovahelp.org
  • Suzanne DUNN, PhD in Law Candidate University of Ottawa, member of the Feminist Alliance for International Action
  • Nathalie DesRosiers, Member of the Provincial Parliament, Ontario
Elise Hansbury

Elise Hansbury

Member of Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development and Society; UQAM
Biography

After completing her master’s degree in international law and then pursuing doctoral studies at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Elise Hansbury is currently pursuing her studies under the supervision of Professor Bernard Duhaime at UQAM. Her research focuses on international human rights law, and more specifically on the inter-American system for the protection of human rights. A student member of Interdisciplinary Research Centre for International Development and Society. She is also a lecturer at the UQAM’s International Human Rights Clinic where she works primarily on human rights issues in the Americas. A member of the Québec Bar, Elise Hansbury practiced law in Montreal and then as a junior lawyer with the International Labor Standards Department at the International Labor Organization in Geneva. She has also acted as teaching assistant in the Department of International Law of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies.

Nathalie Des Rosiers

Nathalie Des Rosiers

Former Dean for the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section, University of Ottawa
Biography

Nathalie Des Rosiers is a well-known professor of constitutional law expert. She served as the General Counsel for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, (CCLA) a national organization that acts as a watchdog for the protection of human rights and civil liberties in Canada, from 2009 to 2013. In that capacity, she has appeared in front of Parliament and various legislative bodies to defend the rule of law and constitutional protections. The CCLA is also an intervener in front all levels of courts in Canada.

Prior to her appointment to the CCLA, Professor Des Rosiers was Interim Vice-President – Governance for the University of Ottawa (2008-2009), Dean of the Civil Law Section, University of Ottawa (2004-2008), President of the Law Commission of Canada (2000-2004).  She has been in private practice in Montreal and London, Ont. and was a professor of law at Western Law School for many years. She was a member of the Environmental Appeal Board of Ontario, of the Pay Equity Board of Ontario, a Commissioner of the Ontario Law Reform Commission and a Board member of the Law Commission of Ontario. She also served as the President of the Federation of Social Sciences and Humanities, President of the Council of Law Deans, President of the Canadian Association of Law Teachers and of the Association des juristes d’expression française de l’Ontario.

She has received many honours, including the Order of Canada in 2013, the Order of Ontario in 2012, an Honourary Doctorate from the UCL (Université catholique de Louvain) in Belgium in 2012, an Honourary Doctorate from the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Medal from the Law Society of Upper Canada, the NUPGE Award, the APEX Partnership Award and was named one of Canada’s 25 most influential lawyers in both 2011 and 2012.

Elise Groulx

Elise Groulx

Lawyer & Mediator, Doughty Street Chambers & Business Integrity
Biography

Elise Groulx Diggs practices international human rights law and international criminal law from a base in Washington DC. She advises corporations on human rights risks in their strategic projects and supply chains. A recognized expert in international criminal law, she also assists businesses in assessing the legal risks of operating in fragile states and conflict zones. She advises corporations, law firms and organisations in the United States, Canada, France, United Kingdom and in Spanish-speaking countries.

She is associate tenant at Doughty Street Chambers in London and “Of Counsel” to Alkyne Avocats (Paris, France)Endo et Associés (Montreal, Quebec) and to Geni & Kebe (Dakar).

She is also Principal of the international consulting group, BI for Business Integrity & Partners LLC, based in Washington with partners in Kinshasa (DRC), Dakar (Senegal) and France as well as partners in England. She also joined the Advisory Board of Lawyers for Better Business (L4BB.org).

Elise offers legal advisory and training services to support corporations conducting human rights due diligence, audits and social risk assessments. She is an expert at helping businesses and financial institutions to assess their legal exposures related to business operations and supply chains in conflict-affected regions. She has advised multinational corporations on a variety of issues including: due diligence assessments for investments in conflict-prone countries; business complicity in war crimes; corporate criminal liability; and remediation programs for victims of human rights violations occurring near mining projects.

Elise convenes the Advisory Board of the Business and Human Rights project of the American Bar Association Center for Human Rights and has spoken on these issues for the last 10 years. She organized a major conference, held in Paris in March 2013, on International Corporate Liability in Conflict Zones jointly with the leaders of the French National Bar Council (Conseil National des Barreaux/CNB), the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Quai d’Orsay) and the American Bar Association (ABA).

She has a track record of convening and mobilizing the international legal profession, dating from 1996 when she first entered the field of International Criminal Law (ICL). She has been a respected voice for the defence and an advocate for the international legal profession at the International Criminal Court (ICC), leading the creation of the International Criminal Bar (ICB) in 2002.

A precursor organization led by Elise, the International Criminal Defence Attorneys Association (ICDAA), was responsible for proposing essential provisions on the rights of the defense that were entrenched in the Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the ICC in 1999-2000. The ICDAA participated in the establishment of a legal aid system in Afghanistan from 2005 until 2011 and did planning work for a similar legal aid project in Haiti.

Elise spent much of her career as a criminal defence attorney in Montréal, litigating complex court cases and engaging in plea-bargaining and negotiations. As a public defender for nine years, she represented thousands of indigent clients. She then started her own practice and handled cases dealing with complex legal policy issues, notably police brutality and a “self defence review” of the cases of women who claimed to have killed their partners in legitimate self-defence. She also sat on a Military Justice Panel advising the Judge Advocate General of Canada for three years.

Elise is licensed to practice law as a barrister and solicitor in Québec (Canada), Paris (France) and European legal institutions including the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She is also a licensed legal consultant in the State of New York.

She was educated in Montréal and has a BA in Political Science from the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and a law degree, with distinction, from the Université de Montréal. She has a certificate in criminology and comparative criminal law from the Université of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas) and an L.L.M. in criminology and comparative criminal law from the London School of Economics (LSE).

In 2009, she was selected to participate in a workshop in the Advanced Study of Nonviolent Conflict at the Tufts University Fletcher Summer Institute in Boston, Mass. She trained to become an accredited mediator in 2010.

Professional Distinctions

  • Top 5 lawyers in Business and Human Rights field (Chambers & Partners Global Guide, 2017)
  • Fellow of the American Bar Foundation (2016), acknowledging extraordinary leadership in the profession, service to society, and commitment to the ideals and objectives of the American Bar Association: “Defending Liberty and Pursuing Justice”
  • Recipient of the Walter S Tarnopolsky Human Rights Award (Vancouver, 2012), recognizing her outstanding contributions to domestic and international human rights
  • Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) advocacy award (June 2012) for her contribution to the rule of law and the defence of civil liberties
  • Champion of Justice Award, National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL), USA (2004)
  • Medal of the Paris Bar (2002)
  • Medal of the Québec Bar (2003)
  • Medal of Université de Montréal’s law faculty (2003)
  • Received the title Advocatus Emeritus (Ad.E) from the Québec Bar Association in 2007; this distinction is the equivalent of Queen’s Counsel (QC) in Québec, Canada
  • Founding President and now Honorary President of the International Criminal Bar (ICB)
  • Board of Directors, Montreal Council on Foreign Relations (CORIM) (2005-2012)
  • Founded (1997) and presided the International Criminal Defence Attorneys Association (ICDAA) for over 15 years
  • Honorary member, Bar of Draguignan (France)
  • Honorary professor, University Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (Lima, Peru)
 
Veronica Martinez-Solarez

Veronica Martinez-Solarez

Latin American Program Director of the International Organization for Victim Assistance
Biography

Veronica Martinez-Solares graduated originally as a lawyer but was quickly drawn to the Social Sciences. PhD (c) from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), at the Latin-American Legal Research Institute, holds a MA in Victimology with the best grade ever from the National Institute of Criminal Sciences, and LLB with honours from UNAM.

Veronica has taken Crime Prevention, Victim Support, and Criminal Policies specialization courses with Irvin Waller; a trainer course from the National Policing Improvement Agency in England; and Citizen Security, Crime Prevention, and Oral Trial courses in Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and Chile. She has been a Visiting Research Scholar in the Institute of Criminology at the Cambridge University in the UK, and in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa in Canada.

She has extensive experience not only as researcher on the subjects of victim assistance, crime prevention, police reform, and criminal justice system reform; but also as a teacher of graduate specialization courses, prosecutor and police trainer, developer of protocols, and international speaker in Brazil, Canada, Croatia, the United States, Mexico, and Peru. She is the author of more than a dozen articles in a wealth of national and international journals.

She worked on a couple of research projects with Irvin Waller, including the development of an evidence based guide for the UNDP to use in Latin America and elsewhere to help governments establish a capacity to invest and develop on crime prevention through social development and comprehensive planning capacities.

Due to her interest in improving institutions in Mexico and Latin America; she has been awarded with several grants by the British Council, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the Legal Research Institute, the Mexican National Council for Science and Technology, the Legal Defence Institute from Peru, the Citizen Security Studies Centre from Chile, the Justice Studies Center of the Americas from OAS, and the Bogota Business Association from Colombia.

 
Lucie Lamarche  

Lucie Lamarche  

Professor, Faculty of Law, UQAM
Biography

Professor Lucie Lamarche’s career includes ongoing research, teaching and publishing in the fields of human rights, social and labour law, international law and feminist studies.  Her major preoccupation surrounds the implementation of economic and social human rights; while she encourages interdisciplinary approaches.  Her academic work has been complemented by work with bodies such as:  the United Nations, UNESCO, Law Commission of Canada, Status of Women Canada, Canadian Bar Association and Conseil du statut de la femme du Québec.

A member of the Quebec Bar since 1978, Professor Lamarche was a Professor in the Faculty of Political Science and Law at the Université du Québec à Montréal between 1988 and 2006.  During that time she also was Vice Dean for Student Affairs (Law) between 1995 and 1998; and, Director of the University’s Centre d’études sur le droit international et la mondialisation [CEDIM] between 2000 and 2004.

In addition to receiving her Doctorate in International Law from l’Université libre de Bruxelles [1994], Professor Lamarche also received: the Jean Monnet post-doctoral Fellowship at the European University Institute [Florence – 1998]; the Quebec Bar Association’s prestigious Mérite Christine Tourigny award [2002]; and, the Merit award of the Centrale des syndicats du Québec [2006].

Professor Lucie Lamarche has joined the team of the Faculty of law of Ottawa University (2007), serving as the Gordon F. Henderson Chair in Human Rights at the Human Rights Research and Education Centre.

In July 2009, Professor Lamarche has been appointed for a five years period as the Research Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre of the University of Ottawa.

Suzanne Dunn, PhD in Law Candidate University of Ottawa, member of Feminist Alliance for International Action

Luncheon: Human Rights Challenges in the Inter-American System·

Luncheon: Inter-American Dialogue does not need to be in quotation marks.

Michael Camilleri, Director, Peter D. Bell Rule of Law Program, “Inter-American Dialogue.”

Michael Camilleri

Michael Camilleri

Director, Peter D. Bell Rule of Law Program
Biography

Michael Camilleri is the director of the Peter D. Bell Rule of Law Program at the Inter-American Dialogue.  An international lawyer and former diplomat, Camilleri served in the Obama administration from 2012 to 2017 as a member of Secretary of States Clinton and Kerry’s Policy Planning Staff and as Director for Andean Affairs at the National Security Council.

Prior to joining the government, Camilleri was a human rights specialist at the Organization of American States, where he served as senior legal adviser to the special rapporteur for freedom of expression of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. He was previously a senior staff attorney at the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL), an impact litigation NGO. Camilleri also worked with a coalition of civil society organizations in Guatemala and at a large international law firm.

Mr. Camilleri holds a B.A. in history from the University of Notre Dame and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. He is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and co-founder of the Americas expert group at the Truman National Security Project, and he has been an adjunct professor of law and international affairs at the George Washington University, American University, and the University of Baltimore. He speaks Spanish and conversational Portuguese.


Round Table 4: National Challenges of the Protection of Human Rights: Inter-American System, National Institutions or Both?

  • Trilingual moderator: Pierre-Gilles Bélanger, member HRREC, U.O.
  • Rapporteur: Salvador Herencia Carrasco
  • Vicente Fernández, Professor, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico
  • Juan Cristóbal González Sepúlveda, Instituto de Derechos Humanos, Chile
  • Alvaro Paul, Professor, Law, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
  • Carolina Loayza, Lawyer and International Public Law Professor, University of Lima

 

Pierre-Gilles Bélanger

Pierre-Gilles Bélanger

HRREC Member and Professor at UofO
Boigraphy

Pierre-Gilles Bélanger has been a member of the Barreau du Québec since 1988.

In 2010 and 2014, he taught several classes at the Law and International Relations faculties at the Tecnologico de Monterrey University in Mexico. In 2011, Mr. Bélanger received Monterrey University’s certification for Penal Law Reform in Mexico. Since June 2012 he organizes a course offered jointly by Mexico and the University of Ottawa Law School on the juridical-political order in Latin America and its relations with Canada. He is presently completing a doctorate in Law at the University of Ottawa, focusing on the penal reforms occurring throughout Latin America and the relation of these reforms to human rights, with a view proposing a suitable way to foster cooperation in the Americas. Since 2012, Mr. Bélanger is in charge of a field of study at the Center on human rights within Latin America.

Salvador H. Carrasco

Salvador H. Carrasco

Ph.d. candidate, member of the HRREC
Biography

Lawyer (J.D.) with experience on International Law, International Criminal Law and Human Rights. Former legal advisor of the Andean Commission of Jurists (2003-2008) in projects regarding the implementation of the Rome Statute in Latin America and the strengthening of the Andean Community. Former advisor to the Committee for the reform of the Peruvian Criminal Code and the Peruvian Human Rights’ Council. Representative of the Andean Commission of Jurists before the Coalition for the International Criminal Court’s Steering Committee. Director of the Project, “Peru’s International Human Rights Obligations” for the drafting of Peru’s National Human Rights Plan for the Ministry of Justice. Lecturer and visiting professor at national and international seminars on International Criminal Law and Human Rights. Author of publications on the International Criminal Court, the Andean integration process and Human Rights. Member of the Latin-American Study Group on International Criminal Law chaired by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation and Göttingen University. Co-founder and pro-bono consultant of SALGALU Comunicación & Responsabilidad Social, consultancy agency on Corporate Social Responsibility and investment in children. Current Senior Jurisdictional advisor to the Constitutional Court of Peru on matters regarding International Law, International Criminal Law and constitutionality of laws (September 2008-present)

Carolina Loayza

Carolina Loayza

Lawyer and International Public Law Professor, University of Lima
BIO TO BE DEFINED
Lawyer and International Public Law Professor, University of Lima, and Lecturer at the University of Piura, UNMSM and the National Centre for Graduate Studies, Peru
Juan Cristóbal González Sepúlveda

Juan Cristóbal González Sepúlveda

Instituto de Derechos Humanos, Chile
Biography

Juan Cristobal graduated with a degree in law from the University of Chile in Santiago and holds a Master’s in Human Rights from LSE in the U.K., a program he attended as a Chevening Scholar. He has successfully completed continuing education programs in Reform of Environmental Institutions, Corruption, Rule of Law and Judicial Reform.

 

His experience is as varied as it is extensive, having served as the head of International Relations and Cooperation of the Ministry of Justice of Chile for over six years as well as, subsequently, in government positions and the private sector in industrial and intellectual property, administrative law, environmental law, humanitarian law, criminal law and international relations. He has served as a consultant in criminal procedure reform in Chile and Ecuador, as counsel to environmental NGOs and has litigated civil, criminal, labor and access to public information cases domestically and internationally. In academia, he has served as adjunct professor at the University of Chile, and as coordinator of a Master’s program in International Public Procurement organized by the University of Chile and American University, and as coordinator of a program in Asian Law at his alma mater.

 

Juan Cristobal is versatile, dynamic, well-organized, perseverant, goal-oriented and a team player. He speaks fluent Spanish and English and reads French and Portuguese. His travels have taken him across Asia, Latin America and Europe. In his free time, he enjoys skiing, trekking reading and stamp collecting.

Alvaro Paul

Alvaro Paul

Professor, Law, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Biography
Álvaro Paúl is a Law Professor at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. He obtained his PhD at Trinity College Dublin (2013), his Master’s degree (Magister Juris) at University of Oxford (2009), and his Law J.D. degree (Licenciado) at Universidad de los Andes (Chile, 2003). He has previously worked in Chile as: a researcher, a parliamentary assistant, and an attorney. His PhD thesis dealt with evidence before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, and his research interests are International Human Rights Law, International Procedural Law and Decision-Making Processes. Álvaro Paúl was admitted to the Chilean Bar in 2004. He has been a guest professor at the Center for Civil & Human Rights at Notre Dame University, Indiana (2015). He has also been a study visitor at the European Court of Human Rights (Strasbourg, 2013), an intern at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (Washington D.C., 2012), and a professional visitor (intern) at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (San José de Costa Rica, 2010). Among other distinctions, Álvaro Paúl has been awarded Fondecyt Research Project (2014-2017), and has been granted scholarships from both the British Council and the Chilean Government.  His undergraduate thesis was honoured with the Fundación Fueyo Laneri award for being one of the four best degree theses of year 2003 (published as a hardcopy book by Lexis Nexis). He has published several articles in both English and Spanish.
·

Vicente Fernández

Vicente Fernández

Professor, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico
Biography

Vicente Fernandez holds a Doctorate in Law from the Department of Postgraduate Studies, National Autonomous University of Mexico. Professor and Researcher at Tecnológico de Monterrey University, he is a recognized National Researcher Level I by the National System of Researchers of CONACYT. Mr Fernandez, is also an external collaborator Legal Investigations Institute of the UNAM.

·


Round Table 5: The Protection of Human Rights of Vulnerable Populations: Inter-American System, National Institutions Both

  • Trilingual moderator: Hélène Dragatsi, Research Facilitator, Office of the Associate Dean, Research & International, Carleton University
  • Rapporteur: Veronica Martinez-Solarez
  • Élise Groulx, Lawyer & Mediator, Doughty Street Chambers & Business Integrity
  • Alex Neve, Secretary General, Amnesty International-Canada
  • Iliana Rodríguez Santibáñez, Dean, Tecnológico de Monterrey, México
Hélène Dragatsi

Hélène Dragatsi

Biography
TBD
Alex Neve

Alex Neve

Secretary-General, Amnesty International-Canada

 

Biography

lex Neve became Secretary General in January 2000. He shares the senior leadership with the Executive Director. Alex is the primary spokesperson for the Branch. Among his many other duties he has participated in Amnesty International missions to South Sudan, Côte d’Ivoïre, Tanzania, Ghana, Mexico, Burundi, Chad, Colombia, Guinea, Honduras, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Guantánamo Bay and Grassy Narrows, Ontario.

He has represented Amnesty International at international meetings such as the Summit of the Americas and the G8 Summit. He has appeared before numerous Canadian parliamentary committees as well as various UN and Inter-American human rights bodies. He appears and writes regularly in the media and speaks to audiences across the country on a range of human rights topics.

Alex is the Chair of the Board of Directors of the Canadian Centre for International Justice and a member of the Board of Directors of Partnership Africa Canada and the Centre for Law and Democracy. He served as a Trudeau Foundation Mentor from 2008-2009.

Alex holds a Bachelor Laws from Dalhousie and an LL.M In International Human Rights Law from the University of Essex. In 2009 he was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Laws degree from the University of New Brunswick. He was named an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2007.

Veronica Martinez-Solarez

Veronica Martinez-Solarez

Latin American Program Director of the International Organization for Victim Assistance
Biography

Veronica Martinez-Solares graduated originally as a lawyer but was quickly drawn to the Social Sciences. PhD (c) from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), at the Latin-American Legal Research Institute, holds a MA in Victimology with the best grade ever from the National Institute of Criminal Sciences, and LLB with honours from UNAM.

Veronica has taken Crime Prevention, Victim Support, and Criminal Policies specialization courses with Irvin Waller; a trainer course from the National Policing Improvement Agency in England; and Citizen Security, Crime Prevention, and Oral Trial courses in Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and Chile. She has been a Visiting Research Scholar in the Institute of Criminology at the Cambridge University in the UK, and in the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa in Canada.

She has extensive experience not only as researcher on the subjects of victim assistance, crime prevention, police reform, and criminal justice system reform; but also as a teacher of graduate specialization courses, prosecutor and police trainer, developer of protocols, and international speaker in Brazil, Canada, Croatia, the United States, Mexico, and Peru. She is the author of more than a dozen articles in a wealth of national and international journals.

She worked on a couple of research projects with Irvin Waller, including the development of an evidence based guide for the UNDP to use in Latin America and elsewhere to help governments establish a capacity to invest and develop on crime prevention through social development and comprehensive planning capacities.

Due to her interest in improving institutions in Mexico and Latin America; she has been awarded with several grants by the British Council, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the Legal Research Institute, the Mexican National Council for Science and Technology, the Legal Defence Institute from Peru, the Citizen Security Studies Centre from Chile, the Justice Studies Center of the Americas from OAS, and the Bogota Business Association from Colombia.

Iliana R. Santibáñez

Iliana R. Santibáñez

Dean, Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico
Your Title

Iliana Rodríguez Santibáñez holds a doctorate in International Law from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She also holds a Certificate in Leadership from Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.

She is currently director of the Department of Law and International Relations at the Tecnológico de Monterrey, Mexico University. She is also a founding member of the Institute for Training and Research in Bioethics and BioLaw. Since June 2015, she is also a columnist for the newspaper El Financiero.

Elise Groulx

Elise Groulx

Lawyer & Mediator, Doughty Street Chambers & Business Integrity
Biography

Elise Groulx Diggs practices international human rights law and international criminal law from a base in Washington DC. She advises corporations on human rights risks in their strategic projects and supply chains. A recognized expert in international criminal law, she also assists businesses in assessing the legal risks of operating in fragile states and conflict zones. She advises corporations, law firms and organisations in the United States, Canada, France, United Kingdom and in Spanish-speaking countries.

She is associate tenant at Doughty Street Chambers in London and “Of Counsel” to Alkyne Avocats (Paris, France)Endo et Associés (Montreal, Quebec) and to Geni & Kebe (Dakar).

She is also Principal of the international consulting group, BI for Business Integrity & Partners LLC, based in Washington with partners in Kinshasa (DRC), Dakar (Senegal) and France as well as partners in England. She also joined the Advisory Board of Lawyers for Better Business (L4BB.org).

Elise offers legal advisory and training services to support corporations conducting human rights due diligence, audits and social risk assessments. She is an expert at helping businesses and financial institutions to assess their legal exposures related to business operations and supply chains in conflict-affected regions. She has advised multinational corporations on a variety of issues including: due diligence assessments for investments in conflict-prone countries; business complicity in war crimes; corporate criminal liability; and remediation programs for victims of human rights violations occurring near mining projects.

Elise convenes the Advisory Board of the Business and Human Rights project of the American Bar Association Center for Human Rights and has spoken on these issues for the last 10 years. She organized a major conference, held in Paris in March 2013, on International Corporate Liability in Conflict Zones jointly with the leaders of the French National Bar Council (Conseil National des Barreaux/CNB), the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Quai d’Orsay) and the American Bar Association (ABA).

She has a track record of convening and mobilizing the international legal profession, dating from 1996 when she first entered the field of International Criminal Law (ICL). She has been a respected voice for the defence and an advocate for the international legal profession at the International Criminal Court (ICC), leading the creation of the International Criminal Bar (ICB) in 2002.

A precursor organization led by Elise, the International Criminal Defence Attorneys Association (ICDAA), was responsible for proposing essential provisions on the rights of the defense that were entrenched in the Rules of Procedure and Evidence of the ICC in 1999-2000. The ICDAA participated in the establishment of a legal aid system in Afghanistan from 2005 until 2011 and did planning work for a similar legal aid project in Haiti.

Elise spent much of her career as a criminal defence attorney in Montréal, litigating complex court cases and engaging in plea-bargaining and negotiations. As a public defender for nine years, she represented thousands of indigent clients. She then started her own practice and handled cases dealing with complex legal policy issues, notably police brutality and a “self defence review” of the cases of women who claimed to have killed their partners in legitimate self-defence. She also sat on a Military Justice Panel advising the Judge Advocate General of Canada for three years.

Elise is licensed to practice law as a barrister and solicitor in Québec (Canada), Paris (France) and European legal institutions including the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. She is also a licensed legal consultant in the State of New York.

She was educated in Montréal and has a BA in Political Science from the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and a law degree, with distinction, from the Université de Montréal. She has a certificate in criminology and comparative criminal law from the Université of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas) and an L.L.M. in criminology and comparative criminal law from the London School of Economics (LSE).

In 2009, she was selected to participate in a workshop in the Advanced Study of Nonviolent Conflict at the Tufts University Fletcher Summer Institute in Boston, Mass. She trained to become an accredited mediator in 2010.

Professional Distinctions

  • Top 5 lawyers in Business and Human Rights field (Chambers & Partners Global Guide, 2017)
  • Fellow of the American Bar Foundation (2016), acknowledging extraordinary leadership in the profession, service to society, and commitment to the ideals and objectives of the American Bar Association: “Defending Liberty and Pursuing Justice”
  • Recipient of the Walter S Tarnopolsky Human Rights Award (Vancouver, 2012), recognizing her outstanding contributions to domestic and international human rights
  • Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA) advocacy award (June 2012) for her contribution to the rule of law and the defence of civil liberties
  • Champion of Justice Award, National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL), USA (2004)
  • Medal of the Paris Bar (2002)
  • Medal of the Québec Bar (2003)
  • Medal of Université de Montréal’s law faculty (2003)
  • Received the title Advocatus Emeritus (Ad.E) from the Québec Bar Association in 2007; this distinction is the equivalent of Queen’s Counsel (QC) in Québec, Canada
  • Founding President and now Honorary President of the International Criminal Bar (ICB)
  • Board of Directors, Montreal Council on Foreign Relations (CORIM) (2005-2012)
  • Founded (1997) and presided the International Criminal Defence Attorneys Association (ICDAA) for over 15 years
  • Honorary member, Bar of Draguignan (France)
  • Honorary professor, University Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (Lima, Peru)

 


Round Table 6: The Protection of Rights in National and Supranational Jurisdictions: Comparing Best Practices Between the African, European, and Inter-American Systems

  • Trilingual moderator: Nelson Arturo Ovalle Diaz, part-time professor U.O., and a member of the HRREC
  • Rapporteur: Dr Jean-Bosco Iyakaremye.
  • Eduardo Andrés Velandia Canosa, Professor, Universidad Libre, Colombia
  • Jânia Maria Lopes Saldanha, Professor and Assistant Director of the Graduate Studies Program, Faculty of Law, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil
  • Pacifique Manirakiza, Professor Common Law section, U.O. • Ricardo Perona, Director of the International Legal Institute of Turin, Italy
 
Nelson Arturo Ovalle Diaz

Nelson Arturo Ovalle Diaz

Professor for the Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa
Biography

Nelson Arturo OVALLE DIAZ has been a part-time professor at the University of Ottawa since 2010 and is also an expert advisor to many social enterprises and community organizations.

In 2015, Professor OVALLE DIAZ earned his Ph.D. in Transnational Law from the University of Ottawa with the thesis entitled: “La production pluraliste du droit transnational contemporain”. His dissertation asserts that the theory of legal positivism, which was relatively valid until the end of the Cold War, seems to have been surpassed by the world of the twenty-first century. The competencies based on the Westphalian model of territorial sovereignty are now shared and exercised by a range of non-state actors. The auto-regulatory power of the latter is rooted in technoscientific knowledge specialized in a particular industry that extends above and beyond state borders. This new manifestation of sovereignty can be incorporated into transnational law. Implementation of the complex transnational legal model is based on a consensus that links states, sub-state units, international organizations and other non-state actors. This new theory must develop a legal discourse based on argumentative strength and not on coercive force. Legal pluralism seems to offer this possibility.

Professor Ovalle Diaz teaches a number of courses on the connections between the law and social sciences. His research interests include legal theory, human rights, international law, constitutional law, transitional justice, social justice, public policy with an emphasis on criminal policies, and alternative mechanisms for conflict resolution which incorporate indigenous perspectives. He has presented his academic work at conferences internationally.

Dr Jean-Bosco Iyakaremye

Dr Jean-Bosco Iyakaremye

Biography

Le professeur Jean-Bosco IYAKAREMYE est né au Rwanda. Il a une licence en droit de l’Université nationale du Rwanda, une maîtrise en droit international (LLM) de l’Université du Québec à Montréal, et un PhD. en droit de l’Université d’Ottawa. Avocat et ancien juge en chef au Rwanda, il s’est spécialisé en Droit international pénal, en Droit international public, en Droit international humanitaire, en Droit international des droits humains et en Méthodologie de la recherche juridique.

 
Pacifique Manirakiza       

Pacifique Manirakiza       

Professor Common Law section, uOttawa
Biography

Professor Pacifique Manirakiza is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law (Common Law Section), University of Ottawa where he teaches Canadian Criminal Law and International Criminal Law and African International Law. In 2015, Professor Manirakiza completed a 4-year term as a member of the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights. In that capacity, he was the Chairperson of the Working Group on Extractive Industries, Environment and Human Rights Violations and a member of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations/Communities in Africa.

In 2014, he has been appointed member of the first African Union-led Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan. In Burundi, he served as an Assistant Professor at University of Burundi as well as a Deputy Prosecutor in Ngozi and Rutana Provinces. Dr. Manirakiza also participated, as a legal adviser and negotiator, in Burundi peace negotiations held in Arusha (Tanzania) from 1998 to 2000.

Professor Manirakiza is a dedicated human rights lawyer. In this capacity, he has always been sensitive to the rights of the vulnerable. As part of a defence team before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, he contributed in upholding the rights of the accused which were not emphasized on in the early years of the Tribunal. Quite recently, he led a team of lawyers before the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, arguing a case on behalf of the indigenous peoples, the Ogiek of Kenya. This will become a landmark case as it was the first time that the Court had to consider issues dealing with indigenous peoples’ rights in the African context. During the last 4 years, as a member of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights, Professor Manirakiza spent a great deal of his time advocating for the rights and the empowerment of local communities affected by the extractive industry in Africa.

 
Eduardo Andres Velandia Canosa

Eduardo Andres Velandia Canosa

Professor, Universidad Libre, Colombia
Biography

Eduardo Andres Velandia is President of the Colombian Association of Constitutional Procedural Law. He is also a Colombian lawyer and professor in undergraduate and postgraduate studies at the Universidad Libre (Colombia), Bogotá, Cartagena, Cúcuta, Pereira and extensions to Villavicencio and Florencia. His area of expertise at the Republican University and the University of Boyacá (Tunja) is Constitutional procedural law. He holds a Doctorate in Law from the Universidad Externado de Colombia.

Jânia Maria L. Saldanha

Jânia Maria L. Saldanha

Professor, Faculty of Law, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brasil
Biography

Professor Saldanha is responsible for the “Internationalization of Law, Cosmopolitan Law and Justice Systems” Chair and coordinator of CCLC (Center for Comparative Legal Cultures) at the University of Santa Maria. She is a member of the Bar Association of Brazil and is an active pro bono lawyer, she has conducted numerous studies on the reform of the Brazilian judiciary. She also holds editorial functions for the journal ERGS, Review of “Emerging Rights in Global Society”.

Ricardo Perona

Ricardo Perona

Director of the International Legal Institute of Turin, Italy
Biography

Ricardo Perona is a professor at Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale, Digspes. He is also a lecturer at Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza. He was also a Director for the Executive Board of Istituto Giuridico Internazionale di Torino (International Legal Institute of Turin). He was also a Visiting Scholar at Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law.


Reception Dinner

James L. Cavallaro

James L. Cavallaro

Former President of the Inter-American Commission and Director for the Stanford Human Rights Center
Biography

Commissioner James L. Cavallaro is a citizen of the United States. He was elected during the 43rd regular session of the OAS General Assembly in June 2013 for the prescribed four-year term, which began on January 1, 2014. In the 154th Period of Sessions in March 2015, he was elected First Vice-Chair. He became President on January 1, 2016, after former Commissioner Rose Marie Belle Antoine –who was the President- finished on December 31, 2015, the period for which she had been elected. James L. Cavallaro is a lawyer with an undergraduate degree from Harvard College, as well as a law degree from the University of California at Berkeley and a PhD in Human Rights and Development of the Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla, Spain. Currently, James L. Cavallaro is a Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Founding Director of both the International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic at Stanford and the Stanford Human Rights Center. Previously, he was a Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Executive Director of the Human Rights Program at Harvard. He founded the Brazil-based Global Justice Center and served as Director of the Brazil offices of Human Rights Watch and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL). He is the author of dozens of articles, books, and other publications on human rights and the inter-American human rights system.


Sunday

 


Plenary Session

Trilingual Moderators: 

  • Arturo Argente, Dean, Law Faculty, Tecnológico de Monterrey (Toluca campus)
  • Pierre-Gilles Bélanger, member of the HRREC, U.O.

 

Arturo Argente

Arturo Argente

Dean, Law Faculty, Tecnológico de Monterrey (Toluca campus)
Biography

Writer, analyst and teacher. Passionate about Law and political news. He holds a Bachelor’s degree from Tecnológico de Monterrey, a Master’s in Law from Indiana University, a Master’s in Business Law from the Law School of Tulane University and a Doctorate in Law from Tulane University. Mr. Argente is a Professor of legal matters at the university level at Tecnológico de Monterrey, at the Judicial School of the State of Mexico and University of Ottawa. He has participated as an analyst and columnist of various national and local media. He is currently Director of the Department of Law, Tecnológico de Monterrey University in Toluca.

 
Pierre-Gilles Bélanger

Pierre-Gilles Bélanger

HRREC Member and Professor at UofO
Boigraphy

Pierre-Gilles Bélanger has been a member of the Barreau du Québec since 1988.

In 2010 and 2014, he taught several classes at the Law and International Relations faculties at the Tecnologico de Monterrey University in Mexico. In 2011, Mr. Bélanger received Monterrey University’s certification for Penal Law Reform in Mexico. Since June 2012 he organizes a course offered jointly by Mexico and the University of Ottawa Law School on the juridical-political order in Latin America and its relations with Canada. He is presently completing a doctorate in Law at the University of Ottawa, focusing on the penal reforms occurring throughout Latin America and the relation of these reforms to human rights, with a view proposing a suitable way to foster cooperation in the Americas. Since 2012, Mr. Bélanger is in charge of a field of study at the Center on human rights within Latin America.


Luncheon : The Possible Place of Canada in the Inter-American System of Human Rights

  • Main rapporteur: Bernard Duhaime, Professor, Faculty of Law, UQAM Guest speaker: The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development Closing Remarks: John Packer
  • Guest speaker: The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development
Bernard Duhaime

Bernard Duhaime

Professor, Faculty of Law, UQAM

 

Biography

Bernard Duhaime is Professor of International Law at the Faculty of Law and Political Science of the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM, Montreal, Canada), where he teaches mainly international human rights law and specializes on the Inter-American System of Protection of Human Rights. He also serves as a Member and Vice-President of the Working group on enforced or involuntary disappearances reporting to the United Nations Human Rights Council. Previously, Mr Duhaime was a lawyer at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States. He is a member of the Quebec Bar in Canada. Pr Duhaime contributes to the defense and promotion of human rights since 1996. He has worked or collaborated with several international and national human rights agencies, having taken part to multiple observation and training missions, and having produced several institutional reports. He advises or has advised many human rights and indigenous peoples’ organizations, human rights defenders and attorneys, as well as international organizations and States. He regularly represents or assists victims and human rights defenders in several contentious cases before the Inter-American Human rights System, UN specialized agencies and mechanisms, the European Court of Human Rights, etc. Pr Duhaime is the author of more than sixty publications and contributed to the following books: « The State on Trial: Policing Protest » (UBCP, 2015), «International law between constitutionalization and fragmentation: the role of law in the post-national constellation» (OUP, 2014), «Defending the Human Rights of Migrants in the Americas: The Nadège Dorzema et al v Dominican Republic Case» (Special Edition RQDI, 2013), « Canada in the Americas: Making a Difference?» (Special Edition Int’l J, 2012); «Protecting Human Rights in the Americas: The Inter-American Institutions at 60» (Special Edition RQDI, 2011); Donner droit de cité aux droits économiques, sociaux et culturels (Yvon Blais, 2011), Human Rights Regimes in the Americas (UNUP, 2010), Le particularisme interaméricain des droits de l’homme (Pedonne, 2009), Governing the Americas: Regional Institutions at the Crossroads (Lynne Rienner, 2007). He also cosigns the « Chronique de droit interaméricain » in the Canadian Yearbook of International law since 2013. In Quebec, Pr Duhaime is a member of various research centers such as the Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en développement international et société (UQAM), the Centre d’Étude sur le Droit International et la Mondialisation (UQAM), the Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la diversité au Québec (UQAM) and the Centre d’Études Interaméricaines (Laval University). He founded the Clinique Internationale de Défense des Droits Humains de l’UQAM and was its first director. Also recognized by his peers abroad, Bernard Duhaime was the Canada-US Fulbright Visiting Chair in Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, United States), as well as the Visiting Fellow at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy), the Visiting Fellow at the Human Rights Program of the Harvard Law School (Cambridge, United States) and Visiting researcher at the Centro de Estudios en Libertad de Expresión y Acceso a la Información (CELE) at the Faculty of Law of Palermo University (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau

Minister of International Development
Biography

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau was elected as the Member of Parliament for Compton–Stanstead in October 2015, and a few weeks later, she was appointed Minister of International Development and La Francophonie by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Before entering politics, Minister Bibeau began her career at the former Canadian International Development Agency. She went on postings to Morocco and Benin. After settling down with her family in Quebec’s Eastern Townships, she became a successful businesswoman and was actively involved in her community.

In her capacity as Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, Minister Bibeau has a mandate to refocus Canada’s international assistance to help the poorest and most vulnerable people, and support fragile states. In May 2016 she launched the International Assistance Review to determine how best to fulfill her mandate. This review calls for consultations with Canadian and international partners, as well as civil society and interested individuals, particularly women and youth, both in Canada and in developing countries. Later this year, Minister Bibeau will deliver a new five-year plan to Cabinet.

Minister Bibeau is calling for actions and programs geared to the education and empowerment of women and girls, whose rights she defends unfailingly. She places women and girls among the top of her political action priorities. The Minister currently has a seat in the High-Level Advisory Group for Every Woman Every Child, an initiative put in place by the UN Secretary-General. She also heads up Canada’s strategy for implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development objectives both here at home and around the world.

Helping Canada exercise its leadership on global health issues, she played a key role in ensuring that our country will host the Fifth Replenishment Conference of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Montréal, Quebec, in September 2016.

Minister Bibeau ardently defends the idea of linking economic growth with the fight against climate change. With this in mind, she plans to help the most vulnerable communities become more resilient through a green and sustainable economy. She is placing considerable attention on providing access to drinking water and the responsible management of this precious resource.

Finally, in light of the conflicts gripping the planet, Minister Bibeau intends to fight for the protection of civilians and humanitarian workers. In the House of Commons she strongly underscores the importance of respecting such humanitarian principles as humanism, neutrality, impartiality and independence.

 

 

Closing Remarks: John Packer

John Packer

John Packer

Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre and Associate Professor for the Faculty of Law, Common Law Section, University of Ottawa
Biography

Professor John Packer has recently taken up responsibilities as an Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre (HRREC) at the University of Ottawa.

Prof. Packer previously held academic positions at the University of Essex where he was the Director of the world-renowned Human Rights Centre and at The Fletcher School, Tufts University. He has held Fellowships at Cambridge and Harvard Universities and lectured at universities and professional institutions around the world. He has been widely published and contributes to the editing of a number of scholarly journals. He also serves on the boards of a number of NGOs and is a Member of the Expert Advisory Panel for the Shared Societies Project of the Club de Madrid comprising almost 100 former Heads of State or Government of democracies.

Prof. Packer is also an experienced practitioner bringing to the University of Ottawa some 20 years working for inter-governmental organizations, including in Geneva for the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, the International Labour Organisation, and for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights investigating serious human rights violations in Iraq, Afghanistan, Burma/Myanmar, extrajudicial executions, arbitrary detention, forced disappearances, the use of forensic sciences, the use of civil defense forces, and the independence of judges and lawyers throughout the world. From 1995 to 2004, he was Senior Legal Adviser and then the first Director of the Office of the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities in The Hague working across Central and Eastern Europe and throughout the former Soviet Union. For the last two years, Prof. Packer was a Constitutions and Process Design Expert on the United Nation’s Standby Team of Mediation Experts attached to the Department of Political Affairs, advising in numerous peace processes and political transitions around the world focusing on conflict prevention and resolution, diversity management, constitutional and legal reform, and the protection of human rights including minorities.

Prof. Packer’s strength in the practice of international law and relations underpins his vision for applied research in public policy and a practice-orientation in the activities of the HRREC. He intends to build on the HRREC’s record of achievement, emphasizing know-how and skills for students and professionals interested in the effective realization of human rights throughout Canada and the world.

 

 

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